Extreme sports are about exhilaration, skill and danger. They do not normally involve teams and there are very few rules. People who take part use their skills and experience to control the risks. That control is what makes them sports and not just dangerous behaviour. Here are three popular extreme sports that you might consider going for on your next holiday.

 

 

Kitesurfing

Take wakeboarding, ditch the boat, add a parabolic kite tethered by 100-foot lines, toss in some wind, and you get kiteboarding, a sport born in the late 1990s that is currently exploding in popularity. Despite the extreme show put on by experienced kiters—who can handle 1000 pounds of force, reach speeds topping 50 mph and fly 50 feet above the water—the sport is surprisingly easy to learn.

Kitesurfing harnesses the power of the wind to propel a rider across the water on a small surfboard or a kiteboard (similar to a wakeboard). The terms kiteboarding and kitesurfing are interchangeable. There are a number of different styles of kiteboarding, including freestyle, freeride, downwinders, speed, course racing, wakestyle, jumping and wave-riding, which is focused on kitesurfing big waves using a directional board, similar to a surfboard.

 

Rock climbing

Rock climbing is an activity in which participants climb up, down or across natural rock formations or artificial rock walls. The goal is to reach the summit of a formation or the endpoint of a pre-defined route without falling.Rock climbing is a physically and mentally demanding sport, one that often tests a climber’s strength, endurance, agility and balance along with mental control. It can be a dangerous sport and knowledge of proper climbing techniques and usage of specialized climbing equipment is crucial for the safe completion of routes. Because of the wide range and variety of rock formations around the world, rock climbing has been separated into several different styles and sub-disciplines.

 

Water skiing

Water skiing usually begins with a deep water start, with the skier crouching down in the water. When the skier is ready, the driver accelerates the boat to pull the skier out of the water.

In addition to the driver and the skier, a third person known as the spotter/observer should be present. The spotter’s job is to watch the skier and inform the driver if the skier falls. Communication between the skier and the occupants of the boat is done with hand signals.

Speeds vary from as slow as 22 kilometres per hour up to 58 kilometres per hour for slalom water skiing; up to approximately 72 kilometres per hour for barefoot skiing, and approaching 190 kilometres per hour in water ski racing.

 

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